sections

Monday, 18 March 2019

Upfront

Sort by: Newest firstOldest firstA-ZZ-A

  • Not in the game

    Deutsche Bank bosses don’t have much skin in the game. That should be a worry for investors and staff as the bank enters critical talks about a potential merger with Commerzbank.

  • Bearing gifts

    The sight of the Greek sovereign in the international bond markets is certainly no longer a breath-catching event, with the country riding high on the back of a two-notch rating upgrade. If it’s not yet back in the mainstream, then at least it’s now at the periphery of the periphery.

  • Debt and deniability

    The collective determination to ignore signs of trouble in China’s bond market is becoming alarming.

  • Flood warning

    After a brutal fourth quarter of 2018 and a very slow start to this year, US ECM syndicate desks are hoping to make up for lost time by bringing a flood of IPOs in the next three months.

  • Get the job done

    Say what you like about Deutsche Bank ­– and many have made full use of the opportunity to do just that in no uncertain terms – but its funding team could not be accused of having failed in its duty over the past few weeks.

  • Calling time

    While bond buyers have to weigh up plenty of variables when making their investment decisions, little seems to get them more exercised than the thorny question of call options.

  • New year celebrations

    This week’s Lunar New Year will usher in the year of the pig, a symbol of prosperity and optimism in Chinese mythology. After a lean year for the country’s equity markets, the latest round of reforms should help bring home the bacon.

  • Project mayhem

    Where in the world can a road builder default on a US$600,000 debt payment when it has more than US$31m locked away in an escrow account specifically designed to service its debt?

  • Going Stateside

    It’s one of the oddities of the sovereign market that eurozone governments rarely visit the US dollar market. Sure, the euro provides plenty of home comforts. But given that many of these sovereigns have billions of euros of annual gross funding needs, it’s bizarre how they continue to eschew the biggest bond market in the world.

  • Desert storm

    What do Boeing, GE, Bechtel and Rolls-Royce (to take a random sample) have in common with BNP Paribas, Citigroup, HSBC and JP Morgan?

Show  10 per page20 per page50 per page