sections

Thursday, 14 December 2017

Upfront

Sort by: Newest firstOldest firstA-ZZ-A

  • ​Don’t be daft

    A new rule introduced without any fanfare by the European Union at the beginning of the month has the potential to significantly damage the European structured finance market.

  • Special delivery

    New credit default swap definitions, intended to reflect the latest bail-in rules for bank debt-holders, could have been written with June’s resolution of Banco Popular in mind.

  • Getting carried away

    Markets reacted rashly to news that Banca Carige had apparently secured the backing of two major banks for a €500m rights issue.

  • Patience, please

    The collapse of Banca Popolare di Vicenza and Veneto Banca last weekend has triggered a fair amount of navel-gazing, and damaged the reputation of the European financial establishment.

  • Volatility index

    Two years ago, MSCI’s decision not to include Chinese A-shares in its benchmark emerging market index signalled the end of a bull run for mainland equities. In a bizarre twist, this year’s review in favour of Chinese stocks has again ushered in a new bout of volatility.

  • Sleight of hand

    What is a sukuk? After Dana Gas claimed last week that its outstanding Islamic bonds are no longer lawful, this is not merely a philosophical question but a highly charged issue that could destroy the sukuk market.

  • To encourage the others

    For once there was no can-kicking, just quick and decisive action.

  • Reality check

    The vampire squid is back in hot water. Goldman Sachs has an uncanny knack - maybe a penchant? - for finding itself at the centre of deals that attract attention for all the wrong reasons.

  • Saving Children

    IFR’s awards events in January raised over £1m for Save the Children, and the money is already helping the charity meet vital needs.

  • Spot the difference

    In a banking crisis, investment success is only partly about timing. It’s also (mostly?) about structure. That truth is underlined once more by losses in excess of US$4bn racked up by Singapore sovereign fund GIC’s investment in UBS almost a decade ago.